Active and Passive Voice Examples for All Tenses

Active and Passive Voice Examples for All Tenses

active and passive voice for all tenses

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between active and passive voice? How do you know which one to use in a sentence? In this blog post, we will go over the active and passive voice examples for all tenses. We will also explain when it is appropriate to use each one. Keep reading to learn more!

Active Voice

In the active voice, the subject of the sentence is doing the action.

For example:

  • I am writing this blog post.

The subject, “I,” is doing the action of writing.

Passive Voice

In passive voice, the subject of the sentence is having something done to them. For example:

  • This blog post is being written by me.

The subject, “blog post,” is not doing the action; it is having the action done to it by “me.”

When to Use Active Voice?

The active voice is usually the best choice for most sentences. It is more concise and direct than the passive voice. In addition, it is usually less confusing for readers.

Here are a few examples of when to use the active voice:

  1. When the subject of the sentence is doing the action:
  • I am writing this blog post.
  1. When you want to be concise and direct:
  • Passive voice can be wordy and confusing for readers.
  1. When you want to emphasize the subject of the sentence:
  • Active voice puts the focus on the subject of the sentence.
  1. When you want to show that someone is in control:

The active voice can make it seem like someone is in control of a situation.

When to Use Passive Voice?

There are times when the passive voice is the better choice. Here are a few examples:

  1. When you want to emphasize the object of the sentence:
  • The passive voice can make it seem like the object of the sentence is more important than the subject.
  1. When you want to hide the identity of the subject:
  • The passive voice can be used when you don’t want to reveal the identity of the subject.
  1. When you want to avoid making someone look bad:
  • Sometimes, you might not want to make someone look bad by using the active voice. In this case, you can use the passive voice instead.
  1. When the subject is unknown:
  • Sometimes, the subject of a sentence is unknown. In this case, you can use the passive voice to avoid revealing your identity.

Now that you know when to use active and passive voice, let’s take a look at some examples!

Active and Passive Voice Examples for All Tenses

1) Simple present:

Active: move

Passive: to moved

Active Sentences: I move the file on the table.

Passive Sentence: The file is moved on the table.

2) Simple past:

Active: moved

Passive: was moved

Active Sentences: I moved the file on the table.

Passive Sentence: The file was moved on the table.

3) Present perfect:

Active: have moved

Passive: has been moved

Active Sentence: I have moved the file on the table.

Passive Sentence: The file has been moved on the table.

4) Past perfect:

Active: had moved

Passive: had been moved

Active Sentences: I had moved the file on the table.

Passive Sentences: The file had been moved on the table.

5) Future simple tense:

Active: will move

Passive: will be moved

Active Sentence: I will move the file on the table.

Passive Sentence: The file will be moved on the table.

6) Future perfect tense:

Active: will have moved

Passive: will have been moved

Active Sentences: I will have moved the file on the table.

Passive sentences: The file will have been moved on the table.

7) Present Continuous tense:

Active: am moving

Passive: is being moved

Active Sentence: I am moving the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file is being moved on the table.

8) Past Continuous tense:

Active: was moving

Passive: was being moved

Active Sentence: I was moving the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file was being moved on the table.

9) Future Continuous tense:

Active: will be moving

Passive: will be being moved

Active Sentences: I will be moving the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file will be being moved on the table.

10) Modals (can, could, may, might, must, should, would):

Active: can move

Passive: can be moved

Active Sentences: I can move the file on the table.

Passive Sentences: The file can be moved on the table.

11) Conditional present tense:

Active: would move

Passive: would be moved

Active sentence: I would move the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file would be moved on the table.

12) Conditional past tense:

Active: would have moved

Passive: would have been moved

Active sentence: I would have moved the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file would have been moved on the table.

13) Present Infinitive:

Active: to move

Passive: to be moved

Active sentence: I want to move the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file wants to be moved on the table.

14) Perfect Infinitive:

Active: to have moved

Passive: to have been moved

Active sentence: I have moved the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file have been moved on the table.

15) Gerund:

Active: moving

Passive: being moved

Active sentence: I am moving the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file is being moved on the table.

16) Perfect Participle:

Active: having moved

Passive: having been moved

Active sentence: I have moved the file on the table.

Passive sentence: The file have been moved on the table.